Coffee: Turkish? Greek? or Arabic?

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As a certified coffee /kahve lover I can’t believe I have not written about this topic before. As I sip my Turkish kahve this morning, I decided to finally share my love and also explain for everyone what’s what about this coffee.

First of all, the type of coffee we are talking about here is a small cup (little larger than expresso) of roasted coffee . It certainly can give you a nice jolt. Sooo… where did this coffee tradition come from? This is a hotly debated topic – really – especially across Europe, and Middle East. Why debated? Such a great cup of coffee that everyone wants to claim it as theirs!

If you are traveling in Greece – don’t dare to call it Turkish or Arabic coffee, they will promptly correct you with ‘huh, what? we don’t have that, would you like Greek coffee?’. If you are traveling in Turkey, not advisable to call it Greek coffee either. So whatever country you are at calling it as theirs will get you a coffee you will be pleased with. Unless you want to anger the waitstaff and drink a bit of spit or who knows what in your cup!

So where do the Arabs come into this picture??? Well they have been making and drinking this wonderful coffee too. Hence they have a claim as well.

Ok so let’s cut to the chase: it is originated in Yemen – during the Ottoman Empire era Turks adapted it around 1640, and made it what is today. And what you get in all other regions and countries are different variations and flavors of the same thing. I love all of them! except for the sweet kind, could be way too sweet for my palate.

Read the full history… (at Wikipedia)

This coffee has infused into the cultures and has become part of the daily rhythm. This is what I love about it – it is not just an occasional thing. Hard to explain unless you grew up on grandmas laps who sipped this coffee while they entertained guest and chatted away life, worries, love, children, money, and all kinds of neighborly gossip. Some of you no doubt know what I am talking about.

This is not a coffee for the faint hearted, it is strong depending on the how roasted it is and how much is used in making it. It is an acquired taste. I prefer to drink it without sugar, and rarely ‘medium’ meaning with a tiny amount of sugar. Some people also are able to read the leftover coffee granules as in fortune telling – it is really a fun thing. Similar to reading tea leaves… Had it done couple times, was fun full of speculation and some things were actually semi true Oooooo!

So next time you are traveling through any of these lands… order one and enjoy it!!

I leave you with the delicious visual of Turkish coffee presented with foam (the way I like it) at Kahve Dunyasi coffee shop in Turkey:
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Share your Kahve moment or picture with us – tell us how you enjoy your cup!

Note: both photos displayed here are taken by surprisesaffron (c). please drop us a note if you want to use them.

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11 thoughts on “Coffee: Turkish? Greek? or Arabic?

  1. When I was living in Dubai, I always found the local coffee too much for me. Mint tea was often offered or, my favourite, chai suleimani. Easy to replicate – strong black tea, with heaps and heaps of sugar. Can’t stand it these days (30-odd years on), double espresso is my tipple of choice now. I still think I’d cover the cup after he mandated two, though.

    • Keith – thank you for sharing your experience.have not had the chai suleimani but can imagine the heavy dose of sugar. Can’t argue with a double espresso! Happy sipping friend.

      Note: if you are open to it, will be coming ur way when we plan out Dubai trip for some off the beaten path tips.

  2. love the whole set, I would say its Turkish kahve/coffee 😀 that was a really nice post, thanks for sharing

  3. I need to try this mouth watering Turkish coffee. Im a coffee lover myself and it’s a taste bud euphoria discovering new ones. Have you tried Vietnamese coffee. Instead of milk and sugar, it has condense milk. A bit rich but defintely yummy!

  4. Thanks for stopping by at mine! Ah Turkish coffee at Kahve Dunyasi is definitely my favourite. Speaking of which, it has been a long time since I’ve been there. A trip is in order!

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